thefader:

INTERVIEW: TIM COPPENS
Sure, it’s fun to look at clothes on the runway, but the true fun and hard work of New York Fashion Week goes on backstage, with designers, stylists, models and make-up artists running around like chickens with their heads cut off all to make it seem effortless and easy once it’s on the stage. We went behind the scenes at Tim Coppens and asked him some questions about his Spring 2013 collection.

Fashion: Behind the Scenes. Cool insight!

thefader:

INTERVIEW: TIM COPPENS

Sure, it’s fun to look at clothes on the runway, but the true fun and hard work of New York Fashion Week goes on backstage, with designers, stylists, models and make-up artists running around like chickens with their heads cut off all to make it seem effortless and easy once it’s on the stage. We went behind the scenes at Tim Coppens and asked him some questions about his Spring 2013 collection.

Fashion: Behind the Scenes. Cool insight!

herewecollide:

These times are hard, but they will pass.

herewecollide:

These times are hard, but they will pass.

(Source: herewecollide, via twloha)

usatoday:

Well, there goes our morning.
Check out the San Diego Zoo’s live Panda Cam.

Panda!

usatoday:

Well, there goes our morning.

Check out the San Diego Zoo’s live Panda Cam.

Panda!

usatoday:

How much student-loan debt is too much?

usatoday:

How much student-loan debt is too much?

nwkarchivist:

Remembering Hurricane Katrina, Seven Years Ago

Newsweek September 12, 2005

(via newsweek)

ianbrooks:

Neil Armstrong 1930 - 2012 by Doug Pedersen
Made for the Denver Museum of Nature & Science. R.I.P. Mr. Armstrong, you lived the dream. Let’s meet up in the afterlife for a tour of the stars.

Artist: Flickr / Behance

ianbrooks:

Neil Armstrong 1930 - 2012 by Doug Pedersen

Made for the Denver Museum of Nature & Science. R.I.P. Mr. Armstrong, you lived the dream. Let’s meet up in the afterlife for a tour of the stars.

Artist: Flickr / Behance

usatoday:

File this (very slowly) under things I don’t need that I absolutely need.

(Source: youtube.com)

Challenge of the Week: Living Offline

Two weeks ago, Paul Miller of The Verge published an update of his life without the internet. As of mid-August, he was three months in the no-internet life. Here’s an excerpt of his confession:

The first two weeks were a zen-like blur. I’ve never felt so calm and happy in my life. Never. And then I started actually getting stuff done. I bought copies of Homer, Plato, Aristotle, Herodotus, and Aeschylus. I was writing at an amazing pace. For the first time ever I seemed to be outpacing my editors. (…) 

Three months later, I don’t miss the internet at all. It doesn’t factor into my daily life. I don’t say to myself, “ugh, I wish I could just use the internet to do that.” It’s more like it doesn’t exist for me. I still say “ugh, I have to do that” — it’s just not the internet’s fault.

A part of me is put to shame as I’m the person who would habitually open three tabs as soon as I’m in front of my computer: Facebook, Gmail, and Tumblr. When I don’t have anything to do, my natural response is to open Facebook, Twitter, or Tumblr to see if there’s anything new—not reading a book.

So, here’s my challenge to you: go off the grid maybe for one hour, a whole day, or even the whole week—create your own boundary—and instead, spend that time to finish up a book, explore, or spend time with others. I will also be off the grid for one day on Saturday; let me know your stories!

Follow up The Verge’s Paul Miller misadventures without the Internet here.

WAWLF?

Let’s bring up the ageless question humanity has struggled for decades—if not centuries: what are we living for?

First: what.
We have to live for something—even if that’s something is nothing (confused, yet?). The catch is: most people don’t like living for nothing. Most people live for nothing because they think they won’t achieve the thing they long the most, so they kill their dreams even before they grab the chance to live it.

Second: we.
We as in each one of us, individuals. Bear with me when I say this: we are all special in our own way. Can you imagine how even more dysfunctional the world is if everybody is doing the same thing as everybody? We all have our own passion and purpose, the things that burns our heart and make our blood races. Trust in complements, not comparison.

Third: living
Personally, I think the biggest mistake whenever we face this question if we forget that living doesn’t just mean “doing something tangibly big”. When you live for something: you walk in it, you breathe it, you think about it constantly, you commit to it, and your entire value system and decisions revolve around that passion. When you live wholeheartedly for something precious to you, everything else that comes after becomes a bonus.

Soon after, people will start seeing and following you not just for your ideas, but for your passion. The world has probably had thousands of people with great ideas, but only a handful of people with passion, perseverance, and commitment.